Teenager’s Chicago Bomb Plot Thwarted — Violent Jihad?

Every once in a while the FBI and the good folks at Homeland Security like to throw us a bone and let us know how they were able to save us from a horrific terrorist attack.  Of course, they always refer to the hundreds of plots they stop every day, but for some reason, only certain ones make it to the top of the pile and actually get reported through the media to the American people.  How many plots they do stop none of us can tell, but you can always bet that when they decide to give themselves a pat on the back, it’s always for a good reason.  The current Chicago bomb plot is no exception.

Some might wonder if violent jihad is more scary than the economy for Chicago.

18-year-old Adel Daoud is in custody as the mastermind behind the plot to detonate a car bomb in the heart of Chicago.  According to the Feds, his goal was to start a “violent jihad” in the city.  Apparently he thought that if he made this happen, his Muslim brothers would rally to the cause and take to the streets for a holy war in the heart of the good ‘ole U.S.A.  The only problem is that Daoud sought out a bomb by posting stuff on the Internet that eventually came to the FBI’s attention.  In an undercover sting, the FBI provided the kid with a fake bomb so he could go through with his plans.  Apparently, the kid actually tried to detonate the bomb before they apprehended him.  I guess they wanted to see how far he would go.

The details of the courtship between the FBI and Daoud paints a terrible picture of the kid and how he went out of his way to recruit others to his cause of jihad.  It also paints a picture of just how the FBI monopolizes on people like Daoud.  They entered into a relationship with him and eventually, according to the official report here, the idea for a car bomb was hatched.  Who hatched the idea?  Daoud or the FBI?  That’s where stories like this get interesting.  If this were an undercover drug deal, people would be screaming about entrapment.  But how far did the FBI go to flush this kid into wanting to execute a terrorist attack that at best would have been small potatoes?

We’re not trying to say that a car bomb going off in downtown Chicago isn’t “terrorist” enough.  It certainly is a terrible act for anyone to want to perpetrate and we strongly condemn it.  But when an 18-year-old kid is willing to go that far to send a message and encourage Muslims to join in his cause, what is his real goal?  Change?  Terror?  To be a footnote in the war on terror.  This was not going to be another September 11.  This was going to be a terrible act spotlighting the hatred of Muslims on America that, if successful, would have probably not resulted in more loss of life than the domestic brand of terrorism that we saw in Colorado in the Aurora “Batman” shootings.

Could it be with Muslims going wild in the “Arab Spring” and torching United States embassies that it was a good time to show how well we are being protected back home?  It’s election year, after all.  It’s a fine time to stop a jihad plot, isn’t it?  But anytime is a fine time for that.

It’s funny how the government weaves its web.  First they apologize overseas for a video that had nothing to do with the American government, wanting to show how much we empathize with Islam.  Next, they want to make sure we know there are plenty of crazies right here at home and how they stopped the madness from coming to the homeland.  Should President Obama apologize to Adel Daoud?  Did American foreign policies inspire his hatred and turn him against America?  Should we recognize his plight and sympathize with him?

What will happen to this child who had big dreams of “violent jihad?”  We’ll never know.  Because the big bad media will never mention him again, not unless it is good timing and serves the purpose of those that control it.

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